A great reminder from a bad dream.

Last night I had a dream that I was invited to The OSCARS. But I was indifferent about going. I made no real attempt to find appropriate attire. In fact, I figured some blue jeans and a decent shirt would do. Apparently I had The Oscars confused with The Allman Brothers.

On the afternoon of the big event I slowly put on my far-under-dressed OSCARS costume. My wife walked in, looked me over, and said, ‘You are not seriously going to wear that!?!’ But I was going to wear it. And I wasn’t being serious.

Making My Way

I slowly meandered towards the venue, not really caring if I got there. Then my Mom called via FaceTime. She was thrilled about me going to the show. Until she saw how I was dressed. My Mom implored me to find something appropriate to wear, but I didn’t listen.

A Lucky Break

After I hung up, I looked down and saw that somehow my very best clothes, including my tuxedo, were at my feet. I finally realized that if I wanted to go to the OSCARS, and actually be let in, I would have to put on the tuxedo. Which I finally decided to do. Then I slowly set off again on my journey towards the venue.

But as I got closer to the event, I could hear an announcement over a loud-speaker. A woman was warning, ‘You must be in your seat in five minutes or you won’t be permitted to enter.’ I began to panic. I ran as hard as I could.  But it was too late. I was too far away to make it to the show on time. Then I woke up.

Facing Reality

When I opened my eyes and realized it was all a dream, I quickly reflected on what I thought the dream meant. Here is my summation:

Breaking It Down

It was a classic bad dream. It played off of my greatest concerns. I had a major opportunity and I blew it. I had everything I needed, served up on a silver platter, and I didn’t realize it. I didn’t care. I didn’t prepare. I wasn’t listening to my Wife and my Mom, who I considered to represent the Universe. I caught lucky breaks, like having my right clothes show up when I needed them. Which, of course, is classic dream nonsense. But still, I didn’t act with urgency until it was far too late. The time had passed. The opportunity was gone. I blew it. As the other Cinderella once said, ‘You don’t know what you got, till it’s gone.

Key Takeaway

This dream played into my biggest fear. Which is not taking advantage of the great opportunities that come my way. I am afraid of not recognizing the chances and advantages and lucky breaks I have been given. I am worried that I won’t hear the messages that the Universe is sending me. I have a serious case of FOMO. But my FOMO is the vaccine that prevents me from contracting a boring life.

*Happy Monday!  Please recognize and take advantage of all the great opportunities that come your way.

Advertisements

What we can all learn from the Best Picture snafu at the Oscars.

When I woke up Monday morning my iPhone was practically on fire. It was glowing and crackling with texts, tweets and push notes. The world was dying to tell me about the disaster at the Oscars. The wrong movie had been announced as Best Picture. OMG!  Hollywood had been embarrassed on national TV! Those poor, wealthy celebrities…

1280_faye_dunaway_warren_beatty_oscars_2017

I couldn’t wait to see the clip. (You can see the whole thing by clicking here. You’re welcome.)

It did not disappoint. The seven minutes of crazy was even better than I could have imagined. It was a train wreck. I squirmed through Warren Beatty’s confusion. I cringed through Faye Dunaway’s quick scan of the card. I felt terrible for La La Land’s la-cast and la-crew celebrating, and thanking, and feeling honored, before having their pants pulled down on stage in front of the world.

I felt even worse for the Moonlighters, who couldn’t really celebrate. After all, they just lost. Now, they didn’t know if they were coming on stage just to have their pants pulled down, before being forced to hand their hand-me-down awards to Manchester By The Sea. I watched it all several times. I will remember those seven minutes of award show infamy longer than I will remember the movies.  

What we can learn.

However, it is important that we take away more from this than the uncomfortable entertainment. Following the debacle I heard many people exclaim, “Someone should get fired over that mistake!”  Let’s think bigger.

We now know that the presenter, Warren Beatty, was handed the wrong envelope by a Price Waterhouse Cooper accountant. PWC has done this for 83 years. Which means a new gremlin was introduced that exposed a flaw in their process. As the founder of the ad agency The Weaponry, I see Envelopegate as a welcomed reminder that we should all use our mistakes to help improve our processes. Not to punish the mistakers.

checklist-book-image

In the book, The Checklist Manifesto: How to Get Things Right (yes, I really read a book about checklists) Atul Gawande, a renowned surgeon, champions checklists as a way to ensure processes are implemented that help save lives in hospitals. He also cites checklists for having done more to prevent airplane crashes than any other innovation. If a checklist helps save lives in hospitals and on aircraft, certainly a checklist could be used to help save some unfortunate moments at The Weaponry and in Hollywood. And probably when you leave a restroom.

Simple Solution

A simple checklist used by the PWC accountants backstage, and the award presenters, would have prevented the mistake.

  1. Ask presenter what award they are announcing.
  2. Check run of show list to make sure the award they are scheduled to present matches answer.
  3. Read the award category written on announcement envelope aloud to make sure it matches before handing it to the presenter.
  4. Make presenter read the category on the announcement envelope aloud to make sure it matches before allowing them on stage.

Boom. Done. Bonnie and Clyde get away.

A Story

Once upon a time I was shooting a TV commercial in Indianapolis for Donatos pizza. When we arrived at the production company’s office for the wardrobe fitting, I was shocked to see the wrong actress there, trying on clothes. After a quick and panicked huddle we understood what had happened. It seemed that once the client signed off on our talent choices for the commercials, a message was relayed to the production house that we would be using all of our first choice talent. So the production company called, and hired, all the first choice talent. However, the first choices were not the same on both the agency’s list and the production company’s list. Yikes!

That afternoon, the production company made magic. They tracked down the actress who should have played the lead, and got her on a flight that night from Iowa City (which is where you go when you don’t think you got the lead in a pizza commercial) to Indianapolis. The next day we shot the commercial and it turned out great. More importantly, we improved our process. After that, my teams have always confirmed the talent choices by name, not first choice or backup.

What you can do now.

Today, I encourage you to watch the clip from the show again. Because it reminds us that mistakes happen. Mistakes are great at indicating flaws in our systems and processes. If we respond correctly, we come out stronger, with a better way of doing things and a lower chance of that same mistake happening again.

Through better processes we can save more lives, we can avoid plane crashes and we can prevent a lot of embarrassment. Getting angry doesn’t prevent a mistake from happening again. Getting better does. There is no need to fire anyone. I think we can all agree that the person responsible for the Best Picture goof will never, ever make that mistake again. Just as Steve Bartman will never again interfere with a fly ball.

If you have a process improvement story spurred by a mistake please share it in the comment section. You may help others avoid the same mistake. Or maybe you’ll just make us laugh. I’ll take either.